TRUMAN STATE UNIVERSITY Pickler Memorial Library Truman State University

Special Collections Services

RESEARCH SERVICES
Due to staffing limitations, research requests will be completed at the discretion of the library staff.  Please be aware that in-depth or comprehensive research may not be able to be accommodated.

REPRODUCTION SERVICES
Patrons may request reproductions of collection material by telephone, mail or email.  When requesting this service, please indicate the collection name and be as specific as possible about the document or information you seek. 

The Special Collections department reserves the right to:

  • limit large amounts of collection material reproduction

  • refuse copy services for materials too fragile to withstand equipment use

  • refuse copy services for materials subject to copyright or other restrictions

For copy requests exceeding 50 pages in length, an additional production fee will apply.  Payment for all reproduction requests must be received in advance and may be made by cash, check, money order or charge (Visa, MC, American Express, Discover).  If you wish to use a debit or credit card, we would suggest you call us rather than emailing the account number & expiration date. If you prefer sending a check or money order, make it payable to Truman State University and mail to:

Special Collections Department
Pickler Memorial Library
Truman State University
Kirksville, MO  63501
(660) 785-4537

FEES (effective July 1, 2012)

  FEE MINIMUM CHARGE
Walk-In/Onsite Copy Request $0.50 per basic* image NO
  $10.00 per enhanced** image NO
Remote/Offsite Copy Request $1.00 per basic* image $5.00 (includes up to 5 basic images)
  $0.50 per basic* image after Minimum Charge  
  $10.00 per enhanced** image NO
Additional Production Fee
for requests exceeding 50 pages
$10.00 per 50 page increment NO
           

DESCRIPTIONS OF IMAGES

*Basic Image  
  Paper Copy
  JPEG (200 dpi)
  PDF -- black and white (multipage pdf is charged by the page)
**Enhanced Image  
  Production-Quality JPEG (>200 dpi)
  PDF -- color (multipage pdf is charged by the page)
  TIFF file
  Other enhancements requested by patron (cropping, etc.)
  Oversize Material Requests (exceeding 8.5"x14")

Acknowledgements

When publishing or exhibiting from our Archives or manuscript collections, please acknowledge with the following:
 
Courtesy of [name of collection], Special Collections Department, Pickler Memorial Library, Truman State University

Copyright

Warning Concerning Copyright Restrictions: The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or reproduction that is not to be "used for any other purpose other than private study, scholarship or research".  If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excess of "fair use" that use may be liable for copyright infringement.

Truman State University does not own copyright to intellectual and/or artistic properties of images or documents, published or unpublished, in any of our manuscript collections. Nor does the University have the right to grant any permissions which might be necessary under the provisions of the privacy laws. While it is not our responsibility to obtain permission for our patrons to use or publish, we will do our best to provide information that will help secure permission.

The following chart is provided as a quick reference for unpublished (manuscript) works and works published in the United States.  It was originally published in Hirtle, Peter B.  "Recent Changes To the Copyright Law: Copyright Term Extension,"  Archival Outlook (January/February 1999): 1-4, and is updated annually. The  complete version includes works published outside the US, some special cases and more extensive explanations and may be found at http://www.copyright.cornell.edu/training/Hirtle_Public_Domain.htm.

Copyright Term and the Public Domain in the United States
 by Peter B Hirtle

 

Unpublished Works

 

Type of Work

Copyright Term

In the Public Domain as of January 1, 2010

Unpublished works Life of the author + 70 years Works from authors who died before 1940
Unpublished anonymous and pseudonymous works, and works made for hire (corporate authorship) 120 years from date of creation Works created before 1890 
Unpublished works when the death date of the author is not known (1) 120 years from date of creation (2) Works created before 1890 (2)
 

Published Works

 

Date of Publication

Conditions

Copyright Term

Before 1923 None In public domain
1923 through 1977 Published without a copyright notice In public domain
January 1,1978 to March 1, 1989 Published without notice and without subsequent registration In public domain
January 1,1978 to March 1, 1989 Published without notice but with subsequent registration 70 years after death of author, or if work of corporate author, the shorter of 95 years from publication, or 120 years from creation
1923 through 1963 Published with notice but copyright was not renewed (3) In public domain 
1923 through1963 Published with notice and the copyright was renewed (3) 95 years after publication date
1964 through1977 Published with notice 95 years after publication date
1978 to March 1, 1989 Published with notice 70 years after death of author, or if work of corporate author, the shorter of 95 years from publication, or 120 years from creation
After March 1, 1989 None 70 years after death of author, or if work of corporate author, the shorter of 95 years from publication, or 120 years from creation
These two charts are based in part on Laura N. Gasaway's chart, "When Works Pass Into the Public Domain," at http://www.unc.edu/~unclng/public-d.htm and similar charts found in Marie C. Malaro, A Legal Primer On managing Museum Collections (Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1998): 155-156.

These works may still be copyrighted, but certification from the Copyright Office that it has no record to indicate whether author is living or died less than 70 years before is a complete defense to any action for infringement.

2  Presumption as to author's death requires a certified report from the Copyright Office that its records disclose nothing to indicate that the author of the work is living or died less than 70 years before.

3  A 1961 Copyright Office study found that fewer than 15% of all registered copyrights were renewed.  For textual material (including books), the figure was even lower: 7%. See current version of this chart for good sources to determine if copyright has been renewed.


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